Source: japantoday.com

The Akasaka-Mitsuke serves as a common stop for both Tokyo Metro Ginza and Tokyo Metro Marunouchi line. As one of the prominent “Sound of Music” song lyrics connote, the hills are indeed alive since it sits in an area composed of 25 hills that houses grandiose hotels, entertainment halls, fine cafés, and restaurants. Aside from that, the commercial district is strategically situated near the shopping arena, nightlife district and Tokyo’s seat of government.

The term Akasaka, which literally means “red slope” was formerly lined with the “madder plant”, whose roots were used to produce a red dye. The name Akasaka-Mitsuke meanwhile denotes Akasaka Guard Post, which then protects the Edo Castle.

Akasaka mitsuke at night
Source: flickr.com – Takanori Mutoh

A smorgasbord of culture, being the seat of various foreign embassies, tradition, and old and new Tokyo, Akasaka-Mitsuke has a lot of eye candy to offer. And after your stroll in this glorious arena, fill your famished self with the food offerings that are in store in Akasaka-Mitsuke.

Reasonably priced sushi would definitely lure you to eat at Uoshin Nogizaka. This izakaya offers fresh seafood so expect the exquisite quality of their sushi and sashimi since the owners are also seafood wholesalers. Space has this open feel thanks to the transparent vinyl walls and rustic designed wherein guests get to sit on crates. For foreigners, no need to be intimidated since the restaurant’s servers are fluent in English. Never miss the house specialty—Nokke Sushi or cucumber roll topped with salmon roe, chopped tuna, crab meat, and sea urchin.

Source: supermerlion.com

Black interiors, trapdoors and scroll menus. If you want some ninja kick while chowing, then Ninja Akasaka is the place to be. This restaurant is run by wait staff that is trained and dressed as ninjas. Once the ninja waiters are done taking your orders, they will disappear only to again appear midair with their sword and tricks. Even the food is ninja-inspired, with dishes such as shuriken shaped grassini served with foie gras patte aka Yamato Spirit Course, Turban Shell Bombs a la Escargot, and the Mystery Dish of croquette with vegetable bits. While the courses might be on the pricey side, the meals and service in the restaurant is surely a treat.

ninja akasaka tokyo
Source: tokyogirlsupdate.com

For more traditional and laid-back Japanese food fare, Umaya is the resto to visit. The place serves yakitori or grilled dishes, pork shabu shabu and hotpot and vegetable dishes from Kyushu. For a more romantic, posh Japanese dinner vibe, head on to Abe and be delighted with set meals inspired from the dishes of the Yamagata region. Another wine-dine place to consider is Zipangu, which specializes in pairing classic Japanese dishes with wine.

Umaya Akasaka-Mitsuke
Source: aboutfoodinjapan.weblogs.jp

For ramen lovers out there, the dashi-stock based hand-pulled noodles of Yasubee is surely a treat.
Bargain food lovers with a scream of satisfaction upon biting into the crispy breaded goodness of Rokuhara. No menu awaits diners in this food joint, instead, be surprised by the dishes prepared by the cooks.

The marriage of traditional and contemporary is indeed evident in the sights and the gastronomic flavors of Akasaka-Mitsuke. Truly one area you shouldn’t miss when in Tokyo. ‘Til our next foodventure.

Aleli is a wanderlust whose main itinerary is to culture soak in the places that she sets foot on, sinking her teeth in the gustatory offerings that the place has to offer and knowing the story behind it. Food for her is a marriage of the sights, sounds, smells, and tastes of the rich history of every city she explores and uses the pen as her tool to share to the world each unique experience she unravels.

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