Sashimi: The Treasure of the Japanese Sea

Out of the many different and myriad cuisines present in the world, Japanese food stands apart with its eclectic choice of dishes. And currently, they are in the limelight thanks to the various talented Japanese chefs going globally to show the beauty of the traditional cuisine. Right now, all eyes are on a very beautiful Japanese delicacy known as sashimi.

History of sashimi

The word sashimi means “pierced body”, where 刺し = sashi (pierced) and 身 = mi (body, meat). Though a popular dish, many non-Japanese tend to confuse it with sushi, however, Sashimi stands for fresh raw meat or fish cut into thin slices, but sushi mainly represents the rice doused in vinegar with an accompaniment of raw fish on the side.

Importance of sashimi

Sashimi represents the finest of all Japanese cuisine and hence preparing them is an art in itself. It was said that the original way of cutting fish for sashimi was only restricted to the ancient samurai and would be inauspicious if used by anyone else. Also, it is usually served at the beginning of the meal just before the main course, so that it is not affected by strong flavors of the latter dishes which may be present. The sashimi made with puffer fish is said to be exotic and extremely palatable, but if not cut and prepared properly, it will lead to serious health complications. Thus only a minute quantity of chefs is present in Japan itself who is qualified to prepare and serve puffer fish sashimi. It is of utmost importance that the fish or meat served to be very fresh, else there is no point to the dish.

Types of sashimi

Sashimi is one of the simplest and yet one of the most eloquent preparations of food. According to popular sources, there are around 21 types of sashimi available! One of the best things about sashimi is that it all boils down to the flavor of the fish. The different condiments and dipping sauces all work together to enhance, not hide the taste of the fish.

Sashimi is available in the form of fish, meat, and tofu as well. Here are some variants of sashimi you could have in Japan.

  • Maguro (Tuna)
  • Sake (Salmon)
  • Saba (Mackerel)
  • Tako (Octopus)
  • Amaebi (Shrimp)
  • Fugu(puffer fish)
  • Ahi (yellowfin tuna)

Apart from all this, you could have beef sashimi and chicken sashimi as well, though they have to be slightly braised on the outside. The condiments served alongside the sashimi is usually to impart a spicy taste and also act as an antibacterial agent.

Get your sashimi here

Tokyo city is one of the best places to try out sashimi in Japan. Some of the top-notch restaurants when it comes to sashimi making. These places have guaranteed the highest level of quality and each dish of sashimi is handcrafted to perfection.

  • Uosho Ginpei
    If you are up for some handcrafted dishes that are beautifully served, then you should go to this restaurant. Their ingredients are of high quality and are from Wakayama which is one of the best fishing regions around the country. They operate from Monday to Saturdays.
  • Bistro Uokin Hanare
    A well-established restaurant is what this one is having around twenty six branches, then this is the place to go. This resto is Italian inspired and yet the fusion with Japanese dishes just work out so well. They have high quality of seafood that you should definitely watch out for.
  • Isari Juhachiban
    Sashimi is great to combine with alcoholic drinks and so you will mostly find it served at izakaya. One of the best izakaya that serves sashimi in Tokyo is Isari Juhachiban. They serve the best quality of fish at fair prices so if you are on a budget but want delicious food, go here and try them out.

So, are the salivary juices filling up your mouth already? If so, don’t wait anymore. Because this is equivalent to tasting heaven, and nobody should decline the chance of tasting something so divine!

Alecksandra is a food hobbyist and otaku who has a deep interest in Japanese culture and cuisine. She likes knowing how every food out there in the open came to be, the meaning of their very names, why they taste the way they do and the diverging concepts that are behind every dish. One day she will travel to different countries to go restaurant hopping and share her food adventures to the world.

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